Pets and Moving

By guest blogger John Cho

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Are you a pet owner looking to relocate to a new home? As most of us have already experienced, moving is very stressful and takes up a lot of your time. For dog owners, however, it is also important to understand that moving can be very stressful for your pets as well. This applies especially to both cats and dogs as they are innately territorial animals (even domesticated pets). Fortunately, there are certain steps you can take to make the pet moving experience a seamless one. In the below infographic by Moving FC, you can learn about quick tips on moving your dogs before, during, and after the move.

Before You Move

Research, research, and do more research. The more research you do, the more likely it is that you will find the dream home for both you and your furry friend. First, confirm that the apartments in your moving shortlist are pet-friendly. On top of that, make sure these pet-friendly apartments have no disagreements over your dog’s breed and size.

Once you have identified the home you would like to move to, make sure you locate a trustworthy vet in the area. Some vets may not be as comfortable with dealing with specific dog breeds. Your best bet to finding a good vet is by asking your existing one to see if he or she knows of anyone within his network.

During the Move

Keep your dog well away from all the moving activity. Your dog can get stressed out when he or she sees all the boxes and household items being moved out from the apartment. Ideally, you should ask your friends or family members to take care of your dog while the boxes are being moved out. If that isn’t an option then find a “safe” room in the apartment where your dog can be situated while things are being moved out.

If you are doing a long distance move then don’t forget to also look for pet-friendly hotels if overnight stays are needed.

After the Move

You are almost there! Before you introduce your dog to the new home, make sure you check out the whole apartment and store away any household items that could be hazardous to your dog. For example, items like household chemicals should be securely stored in a cabinet that’s out of your dog’s reach. When your move in is complete, be sure to check-in with the new vet to make sure your dog hasn’t suffered from any mental or physical-related conditions during the move.

 

Check out John’s website at:

Moving a Dog to Your New Home – Checklist

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